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George Takei to Appear at B&N at The Grove, Vroman’s

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Actor, activist and New York Times bestselling author George Takei will sign copies of “They Called Us Enemy,” a graphic novel based on his experiences during World War II,

Join George Takei – actor/author/activist – to celebrate the release of THEY CALLED US ENEMY at Barnes & Noble at The Grove at Farmers Market on Wednesday, Aug. 21, at 7 p.m.

He will appear at Vroman’s in Pasadena the day before, on Tuesday, Aug 20, from 6PM to 7:30PM

In this stunning graphic memoir (a New York Times bestseller), Takei revisits his haunting childhood in American concentration camps, as one of 120,000 Japanese Americans imprisoned by the U.S. government during World War II. Experience the forces that shaped an American icon — and America itself — in this gripping tale of courage, country, loyalty, and love.

One ticket grants one person admission and one copy of THEY CALLED US ENEMY. The author will sign only THEY CALLED US ENEMY (one copy per ticket). No memorabilia will be signed. Candid photographs are only allowed from the signing line. No posed photos or standing behind the table.

From a childhood spent with his family wrongfully imprisoned in Japanese American internment camps during World War II, George Takei became known around the world for his founding role as Hikaru Sulu, helmsman of the Starship Enterprise, in the acclaimed television series Star Trek. He has since become a strong voice in the fight for social justice, LGBTQ rights, and marriage equality.

In 1942, at the order of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, every person of Japanese descent on the west coast was rounded up and shipped to one of ten “relocation centers,” hundreds or thousands of miles from home, where they would be held for years under armed guard.

They Called Us Enemy is Takei’s firsthand account of those years behind barbed wire, the joys and terrors of growing up under legalized racism, his mother’s hard choices, his father’s faith in democracy, and the way those experiences planted the seeds for his astonishing future.

What does it mean to be American? Who gets to decide? When the world is against you, what can one person do? To answer these questions, George Takei joins co-writers Justin Eisinger & Steven Scott and artist Harmony Becker for the journey of a lifetime.

They Called Us Enemy is truly beautiful — moving, thoughtful, important, engaging, and stunningly rendered. I am so excited to see this book’s impact on the world.” — Jacqueline Woodson, National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature and National Book Award-winning author of Brown Girl Dreaming

“George Takei’s story reveals the important lessons of the WWII Japanese American Incarceration that still need to be learned today. They Called Us Enemy is a compelling must-read for all ages.” — Karen Korematsu, Founder and Executive Director, Fred T. Korematsu Institute

“Moving and layered… Takei challenges Americans to look to how past humanitarian injustices speak to current political debates. Giving a personal view into difficult history, [They Called Us Enemy] is a testament to hope and tenacity in the face of adversity.” — Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“A compelling blend of nostalgia and outrage… this approachable, well-wrought graphic memoir is important reading, particularly in today’s political climate. Pair with John Lewis’ acclaimed March series for a thought-provoking, critical look at the history of racism in American policies and culture.” — Booklist (starred review)

“This evocative memoir shares stories of the nation’s past, draws heartbreaking parallels to the present, and serves as a cautionary tale for the future. For all readers old enough to understand the importance of our collective history.” — School Library Journal (starred review)

“Riveting… Takei has evolved into an increasingly powerful voice for oppressed communities, and They Called Us Enemy finds him at peak moral clarity — an unflinching force in these divisive times.” — The Washington Post

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