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Newsom Talks Climate With Quebec Premier as State Faces Rising Seas

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Malibu: As the sea rises, waterfront residents may be forced by law to move — even abandon — their homes. photo by Al Seib/Los Angeles Times/Used with permission

by Judy Lin for CalMatters

SACRAMENTO — Quebec Premier François Legault will be hosted by Gov. Gavin Newsom in Sacramento to discuss reducing greenhouse gases.

Today’s closed-door meeting in Palo Alto comes as the Trump administration accuses California of overstepping its bounds by entering into an international emissions agreement.

Quebec Premier François Legault will be hosted by Gov. Gavin Newsom in Sacramento to discuss reducing greenhouse gases. Today’s closed-door meeting comes as the Trump administration accuses California of overstepping its bounds by entering into an international emissions agreement.

California’s cap-and-trade program has been around since 2013 and aims to limit the state’s greenhouse gas emissions. Industries meet their goals by lowering emissions or buying state-auctioned permits that allow them to pollute. The permits can be bought and sold.

  • Quebec has long participated in the program, which means companies in the Canadian province that emit greenhouse gases are required to purchase allowances.
  • Newsom has called the federal government’s lawsuit a “political vendetta against California.”

Both leaders are committed to continuing the cap-and-trade program, says Newsom spokesman Jesse Melgar:

  • “Given the history of our partnership around climate, and both leaders being new to office, the premier and the governor will discuss that history and what the collaboration can look like moving forward on climate.”

Legault wraps up a three-day trip to California after meetings in Hollywood and Silicon Valley.

State unprepared for rising seas

Homes and hotels along the Orange County coast are threatened by rising seas.

California needs to move faster in preparing for rising sea levels that can topple critical roads and infrastructure, not to mention devastate communities. That’s the wake-up call in a new report from the nonpartisan Legislative Analyst’s Office. Elizabeth Castillo has more on the report here.

  • California’s coast could experience sea rise by a half foot by 2030 — and up to 7 feet by 2100.

What’s at stake? More than $150 billion in property could be at risk of flooding by 2100, far more devastating than the state’s worst earthquakes and wildfires.

  • “Progress of sea level rise preparation across the state’s coastal communities has been slow. Coastal communities must increase both the extent and pace of sea level rise preparation efforts if California is to avoid the most severe, costly and disruptive impacts in the coming decades,” the report warns.

The report could act as a guide for lawmakers in the next year. For more, check out Julie Cart’s recent past project on how rising sea levels are threatening California.

This article is produced as part of WeHo Daily’s partnership with CalMatters, a nonpartisan, nonprofit journalism venture committed to explaining how California’s state Capitol works and why it matters.

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